The ‘dead cities’ of the Zuiderzee

http://www.henkvanheerde.nl/vollenhove/visserij/visserij15eeeuw.htm

Map showing the Zuiderzee area. Appears under a creative commons licence at http://www.henkvanheerde.nl/vollenhove/visserij/visserij15eeeuw.htm.

Continuing on the theme of travel, in this post I concentrate on a book with the curious title The dead cities of the Zuyder Zee which I found at Erddig. Before the construction of the Afsluitdijk in 1932, the IJsselmeer was open to the sea – although by the time it was closed off, much of it had begun to silt up, leaving the communities which depended on the sea for their livelihood completely destitute. However, during the Dutch Golden Age, cities like Hoorn, Enkhuizen, Volendam, and Stavoren had thrived as bustling trading and fishing harbours. Where siltification was less pronounced, such as at Kampen, the sea still provided some source of income, while Amsterdam benefited greatly from the construction of the Noordzee Canal and trade with the Dutch colonies. Continue reading

A cruise to the North Cape

Lithograph (colour) showing Tromso

A few weeks ago, I touched upon the travels of Richard Fynderne Harpur Crewe (1880-1921), the only son of the last baronet at Calke Abbey. In this post, we’ll explore a cruise to the North Cape he appears to have taken in ca. 1913. Continue reading

Return to Calke

By the time you read this, I will have gone back to Calke Abbey for a few more days. The cataloguing of the books in store was always going to take a while: there are about 5000 items. And not just books and journals, but also many, many music scores. But Calke wouldn’t be Calke if there weren’t some very quirky volumes hiding on the shelves. Continue reading